Mapping Galaxies

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That?

Oh, that’s a 600-billion-billion-kilometre-wide chunk of the universe – or at least a simulation of it.

Astronomers working on the Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (BOSS) are attempting to map galaxies and hydrogen gas clouds in the universe by looking for the light of super-bright quasars, luminous objects that are thought to be powered by black holes devouring matter. Galaxies and gas clouds leave an imprint on this quasar light as it passes through them, which can be used to deduce their positions.

To make sense of these imprints, the BOSS team create simulations of quasar light passing though cosmos-spanning gas clouds and compare them with the real thing. The picture above shows a simulation of a cube of the universe 65 million light years across. The red blobs are clusters of galaxies, while the blue filaments show regions of low-density filled with clouds of gas.

Source: New Scientist

Photo – Venus In Transit

Bacoli, near Naples, Italy
6 June 2013
Image: ©Adam Allegro

From his blog catchthejiffy – “Here are the first photos (that I have seen anyways) from Europe of Venus transiting the sun. Conditions were very good for shooting this morning, and I had about a 4 minute window before clouds completely covered the sun. I was shooting with a Nikon D800, 28-300mm lens, Slik Pro tripod, and remote release, and all photos were taken from the Bacoli sea wall just outside of Naples, Italy. No filters were even necessary.”

PHOTOS: The Historic Transit of Venus

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Source: Discovery News

Dance of the Planets

The planets in the heavens move in exquisite orbital patterns, dancing to the Music of the Cosmos. There is more mathematical and geometric harmony than we realize. The idea for this article is from a book Larry Pesavento shared with me. The book, ‘A Little Book of Coincidence’ by John Martineau, illustrates the orbital patterns and several of their geometrical relationships. .

Take the orbits of any two planets and draw a line between the two planet positions every few days. Because the inner planet orbits faster than the outer planet, interesting patterns evolve. Each planetary pairing has its own unique dance rhythm. For example, the Earth-Venus dance returns to the original starting position after eight Earth years. Eight Earth years equals thirteen Venus years. Note that 8 and 13 are members of the Fibonacci number series.

Earth: 8 years * 365.256 days/year = 2,922.05 days
Venus: 13 years * 224.701 days/year = 2,921.11 days (ie. 99.9%)

Watching the Earth-Venus dance for eight years creates this beautiful five-petal flower with the Sun at the center.* 5 is another Fibonacci number.)
The planets in the heavens move in exquisite orbital patterns, dancing to the Music of the Cosmos. There is more mathematical and geometric harmony than we realize. The idea for this article is from a book Larry Pesavento shared with me. The book, ‘A Little Book of Coincidence’ by John Martineau, illustrates the orbital patterns and several of their geometrical relationships. .

Take the orbits of any two planets and draw a line between the two planet positions every few days. Because the inner planet orbits faster than the outer planet, interesting patterns evolve. Each planetary pairing has its own unique dance rhythm. For example, the Earth-Venus dance returns to the original starting position after eight Earth years. Eight Earth years equals thirteen Venus years. Note that 8 and 13 are members of the Fibonacci number series.

Earth: 8 years * 365.256 days/year = 2,922.05 days
Venus: 13 years * 224.701 days/year = 2,921.11 days (ie. 99.9%)

Watching the Earth-Venus dance for eight years creates this beautiful five-petal flower with the Sun at the center. Note, 5 is another Fibonacci number.

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All that.effort during childhood paid off!

For even more! go to the original web page from the mighty Ensign Inc.

Mercury’s Volcanoes

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Picture: NASA / JHUAPL / CIW-DTM / GSFC

This color-coded perspective view shows elevations in the ancient volcanic plains that lie the northern high latitudes of Mercury, as revealed by NASA’s Messenger spacecraft. Purple colors are low and white is high, spanning a vertical range of about 1.4 miles (2.3 kilometers).